Learning an Instrument

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If you are interested in your child learning an instrument, you may wish to read 'The Right Instrument for Your Child' (see link below).

From personal experience, we would strongly recommend the Suzuki method of learning. You can find out more at www.britishsuzuki.org.uk where you will find a list of local teachers. Both Louise's and Andrea's children have learned to play instruments using the Suzuki method. Suzuki teachers tend to start with very young children aged 2 - 6 yrs. The Suzuki method does however require significant support from the parent, and although children usually make excellent progress, it will not suit every family due to the high level of commitment and the demands it can place on a parent's time. For more information on the ethos behind the Suzuki method, please see the books below. Most Suzuki teachers will require you to read one of these books before your child takes up lessons so that you understand the principles.

If you wish to start your child at an older age or with a different method, there are some music teachers listed on www.musicteachers.co.uk. Research has shown that the earlier a child starts practising an instrument, the greater the benefit to their brain in terms of bringing about physical changes that enhance their ability in some other areas of learning. However, you would be wise not to overly tire your child by starting an instrument just before or just after they start full time school. This is more likely to lead to them giving up.

Whatever method you go for, there is a fantastic book obtainable from the British Suzuki Institute: 'How to get your child to practise without resorting to violence’ which has useful tips for any parent. It is realistic about the fact that normal children do not always enjoy practising and discusses techniques to succeed with encouraging practice as a daily activity for a normal child! Although this book looks uninteresting on the cover it is a definite 'must have'.